The food channel comes home!


Having spent two nights in a hospital room with a poor WiFi signal, needles piercing my arms and eating some rather bland food, coming home was a heavenly feeling.

The hospital wasn’t all that bad. For starters, atleast we didn’t have to cook, or worry about household chores. Then there was a large TV – a device we have chosen not to include in our house. After all, who needs another screen and another monthly subscription for something we neither have time nor inclination to watch. So there we were in that homely room switching between food and science channels for pretty much all our waking hours. I have to say it had a little bit of an impact on me.

I’m not really a foodie. I know lots of people who are – they know which is the best place to eat in pretty much any part of town; what is the speciality of those food joints; and are even willing to travel a fair distance just to taste that one flavour which has the perfect contrast of textures and smells. For me, all that is Greek and Latin. But after a prolonged exposure to the micro waves of the TV shows, I decided to turn into a chef for a while.

The recipe – a tower of biscuits layered with creamy chocolate and dunked in coffee – was one my mother had been wanting to try out for long.

I took pictures along the way and noted down all the steps – detailing everything a TV chef would likely mention. Taking pictures meant that it took us four times the time it would normally take to make this sweet.

This week, Jen Hooks asked bloggers where their heart is. Right now, it is set on devouring this delicious piece of home-made tower of biscuits!

The tower of biscuits

To see how other bloggers interpreted this week’s photo challenge, head over to the Daily Post.


For those who are interested, here’s the recipe:

  1. Whip some milk cream with chocolate sauce.
  2. Add cornflour and heat the mixture over low flame, stirring constantly, till it thickens into a smooth paste.
  3. Spread the mixture over 6 Marie biscuits and place them one on top of the other.
  4. Cover the tower with an extra biscuit and press lightly.
  5. Pour coffee decoction over the tower, ensuring that the biscuits are fully soaked. Drain the excess coffee and place it in the freezer.
  6. Remove it after about half an hour, or till it becomes stable. It should be soft and have the consistency of cake. Make sure it does not freeze completely, or it will be nearly impossible to eat it!
  7. Serve as is, or sliced.
  8. Consume immediately – we did not keep it to test its shelf life ūüėČ

H2O


States of H2O
The three states of H2O

View of the snow-capped mountains surrounding the holy glacier at Tsomgo (also called Tsangu or Changu) Lake beneath cloudy skies.

In response to the photo challenge on the Daily Post by Lignum Draco

Getting crafty


… and making a small mess in the process!

Thanks to this great tutorial, a few clothespins, a pair of scissors and lots of glue, a few brown paper bags lying around the house got a makeover – a mid-week holiday well spent!

basket_craft_collage_small
The basket at various stages of completion

And yes I used my finger to spread the glue and am enjoying peeling off the residue!

Check out how bloggers around the world are having fun at the Weekly Photo Challenge.

Grainy images from my phone edited with Befunky

The time machine


This week, the guest at the Daily Post asks us to tell time. The challenge had me all excited and geared up!

I have a fascination for gears and enjoy watching them at work. The way the individual pieces¬†interlock;¬†their movement harmonious and in-sync;¬†and that¬†rugged metallic look! These simple machines have stood the test of time (pun unintended!) and can work reliably even after years of use, unlike modern¬†digital goods. And so, for this week’s Photo Challenge, I decided to photograph the inner mechanisms of a mechanical clock. Until next time…

time_machine.jpg
A look inside a clock

Alphabet


Several years ago, my uncle¬†gifted me a bead loom kit. Seeing the actual tools used to make bead jewellery got me excited. I couldn’t wait for my holidays to start using it. My mother and I read through the manual and she¬†assembled¬†the loom. I drew out an elaborate design on the¬†drafting paper provided with the kit and had begun imagining a¬†bracelet on my wrist!

It was only once I had drawn the grid for the design of my bracelet and begun weaving each individual bead into the loom that I realised the effort that is involved in beading.

I have always found it difficult to haggle with street vendors selling these kinds of bracelets.¬†Having tried it out myself, I¬†don’t even think of negotiating.

This one with my initial is one of the handful of bracelets I weaved on the loom.

alphabet_k

Explore all the alphabets over at the Daily Post

Weight(less)


This week’s weighty photo challenge had me jumping with delight. A perfect excuse to share this picture I took at Anandagram last month.

Anandagram offers a beautiful and serene environment to visitors. It houses 3 private museums housing traditional Indian household objects, terracotta and textiles from across the country. The buildings, styled like traditional houses, are surrounded by vast manicured lawns with¬†discarded objects¬†turned into art installations! Kept spotlessly clean, this leaf was about the only item¬†which ‘littered’ the place – and it too was pretty ūüôā

leaf_on_the_ground

Gathering Knick Knacks


Those who know me, whether in person or via WordPress, know that I love collecting things in general – be it coins, rocks, feathers, chocolate boxes… And more often than not, the packaging¬†of a product makes my heart¬†jump for joy!

Here’s yet another addition to my ever-growing box of knick knacks!

gathering_knick_knacks.jpg
Coins with Greek motifs

For more interpretations of this week’s Photo Challenge, be sure to gather around the Daily Post!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Transition


transition.jpg
From a tiny bud and a full blossom to a wrinkled memory

For more images portraying transition, be sure to check out the Weekly Photo Challenge: Transition


nanopoblano2015lightThis is post #28 in this year’s NaBloPoMo, or as Ra calls it Nano Poblano

NaBloPoMo = National Blog Posting Month = Thirty straight days of blogging