Forces of Nature


A couple of weeks back, the Daily Post asked us to show forces of nature.

While I did not have a photograph to show, I was inspired to paint something involving as many forces of nature, and a few forces that are influencing nature. How many can you identify? Who’s the strongest of them all?

Forces of Nature - Abstract Art
Forces of Nature – Abstract Art

Happy Typing!


Many years ago, I saw a movie in which the villain had written a ransom note using letters cut out from different newspapers. For something as evil as what the note said, it sure looked interesting! I am not sure if I tried to do something like that for myself — if I did, it was most likely a terrible failure. But buried somewhere in the deep recesses of my sub conscious brain, was this fascination for mismatched type and lettering.

Today, as I was catching up on email, I discovered this simple, yet wonderful site that turns text into random images. I freaked out. For the next several minutes I typed happily and watched them magically turn into fun image collages. As one reviewer, Keren Phillips, noted “I feel like I’ve been waiting for this FOREVER, I just didn’t know it.”

A little while later, this is what decorated my desktop:

design

The letters in these images are actual illustrations/photographs posted on Instagram. The images are copyrighted, and the collages can be used only for personal purposes.

Check it out at Type to Design and have fun! (works only on desktop) A shout out to Product Hunt, through which I found out about this fun app.

And yes, I typed out my name as well :-) Tapping into the narcissist in me, perhaps?

That's my name
I just couldn’t resist!

Broken


My grandmother often says that of the several artistic abilities our family possesses, the ability to throw, is the one that we need the most! At our home, when things break, our instinctive reaction is that of fixing them. So for this week’s photo challenge, broken, I had quite a few options at home! Except, of course, they had mostly been fixed, or have become something else. For instance, the beads from several broken bracelets and necklaces have now become a gypsy-style garland. And all the broken seashells from our collections have now become a decorative wall hanging.

* * *

We were in Old Delhi to meet relatives and decided to explore Qudsia Bagh in the evening. Clean jogging tracks surrounded by palm trees and Laburnums in full bloom, the park was a sight for sore eyes and sun-drained explorers like us. Large pots of water and benches with bird feed attracted birds by the dozen.

“What are you waiting for? Take out the camera!” It took me a little while to react. My brother nudged me as I stared at a kite sitting atop the earthen pot. Before I could take a clean shot, it flew above us and onto a tree branch. Another one swooped down and flew low, before joining its friend on the branch. They didn’t seem to mind the people around them — little children swinging on monkey bars and groups of evening walkers.

We continued walking, and it wasn’t long before we spotted a wall behind a few trees. An old building! After several months, we discovered something old in Delhi. An entrance gate of some sort, with a staircase on the side leading up to the roof; an old locked up lodge that seemed appropriate for some mystery novel; and a mosque under renovation — we hopped from one building to another, trying to cover as much ground as possible in the little time we had left in the day. But with daylight fading and our stomachs grumbling, we had to head back.

As we were returning, I noticed this minaret-like structure. It turned out to be at the exact same place we saw the kites earlier. In our excitement of seeing the kites, I’d missed this one entirely.

Minaret at Qudsia Bagh
Minaret at Qudsia Bagh

I clicked a few more photographs of the park just as a peacock came out for its evening walk.

We may go and visit Qudsia Bagh again. We might climb the gate, inspect that old house more closely, and perhaps, find more treasures.


From Wikipedia: Qudsia Bagh is an 18th-century garden complex and palace located in Old Delhi, India. Constructed in 1748 for Qudsia Begum, this complex was largely destroyed during the Indian rebellion of 1857.

For more broken images, visit the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge: Broken

A city enveloped


The sky was overcast and a gentle wind greeted us as we stepped out to buy a mango shake.

‘It won’t rain, ma’am. These clouds do not bear water,’ the office boy said.

We were going to return within 10 minutes. But I took my umbrella, to be safe.

As we soon found out, it wasn’t the umbrella we needed, but goggles.

On our way back, the wind grew stronger, kicking up dust all around us. I covered my glass of mango shake with a lid the juice vendor gave.

We couldn’t see much around us. Partly because the air was saturated, but mostly because we could barely keep our own eyes open.

With the dust coming straight at us, we tried to shield ourselves with our palms and narrowed our eyes as much as we could.

Only a short distance to go, we walked as fast as we could with our eyes closed and turned into the street in front of the office building. The dust storm ended a little while later, with a light drizzle cleaning the air.

That evening, we headed home covered by a fine layer of dust from head to toe. The evening sky though, was a treat for our dust-laden sore eyes.

Enveloped
Enveloped

We later found out that the wind speed was around 80 kmph. Tree branches had fallen all over the city. A streetlight had fallen on a metro power line, crippling the public transport system.

More fascinating images here: Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge: Enveloped

The wandering mind


Sometime back, I unearthed old drawings from the depths of my cupboard*.

I’m not sure what this drawing is about and what was going through my mind at the time I drew this. Perhaps it was my subconscious trying to communicate to me. A few random thoughts escaping the labyrinth of my brain, and finding their way to the paper.

From what I can imagine, it is likely that it started off as a tranquil hill. And then somewhere down the line there was turbulence of some sort — a storm at sea — which tossed away all notions of peace.

What do you think? How would you interpret this?

motion
Abstract art – thoughts in motion?

For more ‘moving’ images, check out the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge – Motion.

*Other old drawings from the past:

Depth
Which colour do you see?

The lately-early bird


It took me a full week to try to get up early. And this morning, I finally managed to get up by 6 am. Unfortunately, in these parts of the world, six is well past sunrise. Still, I tried. Although the next challenge is already in motion (bad pun, I know), I wanted to share this picture of the sleeping hibiscus in our balcony.

She was still half asleep, rubbing her groggy eyes and taking a big lazy yawn, when I saw her. It would be another three hours before she would be in full bloom. By the time I see her next, she would have moved on to another world, never to be seen again — until she takes a new birth, and opens her wide eyes and gives her best smile, to brighten up someone’s day.

Waking beauty
Waking beauty – a hibiscus about to bloom

To see more genuine early birds out there, visit the Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge

Art from scrap


It was on the first of March, a Sunday, that our family got together. It was after such a long time that we went out together, that we joked that it would rain. And sure enough, it did! Little did we know, that it was the beginning of a very strange phenomenon. Not only on that day, but almost every subsequent Sunday, it rained.

North India has witnessed, over the past two months, unpredictable weather, and many crops have been damaged due to this unseasonal rain. Vrindavan, it appears had its own share of golf-ball sized hail storm, if the pictures shared on WhatsApp are to be believed*.

Is this weather a result of climate change? I don’t know. But it definitely seems eerie.

A few weeks back, I was at the India Habitat Centre, where I saw a very interesting art installation, and seemed to fit in rather well with the issue at hand. Delhi-based artist Gopal Namjoshi combined scrap iron to create a garden, to highlight the importance of ecological conservation. The garden included flowers, small birds, deer and peacocks, as well as a man resting on a chair!

Below are a few snapshots of the installation.

For more about the artist, please visit Gopal Namjoshi’s Website

Related News Article: Installations made from scrap

* Images of the Vrindavan hailstorm – Any of you received these images on WhatsApp?

Spring DIY project


Winter was on its way out, and the old leaves were making way for new little ones to spring up and take their place. The minute I saw these large leathery beautiful leaves on the pavement, I knew I had to pick them up. I didn’t know what I would do with them. But I brought them home anyway.

A few days later, they had dried out completely and their leathery texture was gone. But I wanted to keep them with me. We had clear wood varnish leftover from an earlier project of mine. So on Holi, I painted these leaves.

Work in Progress
Work in progress
A few days back I assembled them and hung them near a window. Now I see them everyday, first thing in the morning, and just before I go to sleep.
All tied up and hung
All tied up and hung